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Audience: Resources, Homepage, VES Fab Lab, Stefanie Hermes, Services, Staff, Principals, Sys Admins, Teachers, Associates, Homepage, Health, Counselor's Corner, PTO, PTO and Contact Us
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Posted by: Stefanie Hermes
Published: 3/28/18




Audience: Homepage and Homepage

VES will be fully implementing the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) during the 2016-17 school year.  If you would like to view these new standards, click here, and you will be directed to a grade by grade description of what is in store for your child's science future.

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Posted by: Laura Brooks
Published: 3/2/18




Audience: Homepage and Homepage

AmazonSmile is here!  It is simple and just a click adds .5% to much needed funding for our school.  Click here to find the link to AmazonSmile, then below the search bar on the home page it will say "Supporting TES VES PTO".  Please note that we are unable to order Bridge Books this year.  PTO is in need of volunteers to help with the many programs and fundraisers that support these summer extension resources.  However, you can go to Amazon, order Summer Bridge Books, and click onto AmazonSmile to help your child and your school at one time!

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Posted by: Laura Brooks
Published: 3/2/18




Audience: Homepage

  Shelter in Place

 Shelter in place drills are used to protect students and staff from

  • chemical, radiological or biological contaminants released in the environment or

  • hostile situations that could occur on or near campus.

The bottom line is to get students inside and keep any dangerous substance or person outside!

 

For a hostile person on campus: 

Once inside and doors locked, it is important for students to remain calm and quiet. Students will be trained to be as “invisible to the outside” as possible:

  • Silently duck and cover or get to a place least visible to the outside.

  • Remain silent, calm and quiet.

  • Lock all doors and windows and turn off lights.

  • Students are advised to NOT USE THEIR CELL PHONES. It could put parents in jeopardy and foil police efforts.

For a contaminant on campus

Once the “Shelter in Place- Contaminant” announcement has been made all students will move inside as quickly as possible.

In the case of a real emergency, you would:

  • Lock door and Seal (with duct tape) the areas surrounding the door(s) of the classroom.

  • Close all windows and turn off heating or air conditioning.

  • Instructions and additional information will be sent via district email or the intercom system.

  • Students can remain at their desks and work can be completed unless otherwise announced; students must be quiet enough to hear the intercom when used.

  • Wait for the “All Clear” to be called on the intercom before letting anyone out of the room.

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

Strive for FIVE!

Only 5 absences

Only 5 tardies

 

Students are marked tardy when they are late in the morning or when signed - out from school for any portion of the day.  With the exception of doctor's appointments (be sure to get a note from your child's physician), these partial absences are counted into total absences per the State Attendance Review Board (SARB).    

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

Now that the excitement of the new school year has occurred, many parents begin the homework routine - or maybe dread it.  I believe that homework serves three purposes: To let parents know what their children are studying, to practice newly learned skills, and to build home to school responsibility.  Think of yourself as an assistant at homework time, but do not feel you need to do your child's work for them.  The teachers assign homework that should be easily completed by your child independently.

 

Here is an excerpted  article from Scholastic.com that should be of help to you. It has been slightly modified for grades 3-5, and to reduce the length of the article.  The gist is the same...my apologies for elements of plagiarism.  My thanks to Scholastic. LB

 

1. Do It as Early as Possible: Best for Everyone

On days when there are no afternoon activities, give your child a time frame — say, between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. — to get down to business. This gives her some control over her schedule (some kids need a longer break after school, and others need to start right away to keep the momentum going). The only rule is that 5 o’clock is the latest time to start. If you work, that means homework duties will fall to the after-school caregiver. This way, the bulk of it can get done before your kiddo’s too pooped — and you can just review and wrap things up once you get home.

 

2. Create a Call List: Best for Forgetters

From kindergarten on, kids need a list of three or four classmates they can call on when they forget an assignment, says Ann Dolin, M.Ed., a former teacher and author of Homework Made Simple. The study buddy can read your child the spelling words over the phone, or his mom can snap a pic of the worksheet and text it to you.

 

3. Build Confidence: Best for the Intimidated

When kids don’t get something right away, they may feel like they’re stupid and start to shut down, says Sigrid Grace, a second-grade teacher in Almont, MI, and a member of Scholastic Parent & Child’s advisory board. You can short-circuit negative thinking by sitting down and figuring out the first problem together. That alone can help him remember how to do the rest. Then heap on the praise: “You did a great job on that one! Try the next one now.” 

 

Another strategy: Have your child show you similar problems s/he worked on in class. That may jog his memory so s/he can retrace the steps. Plus, it helps you see what he’s already learned.

 

4. Cut It in Half: Best for the Overwhelmed

That’s right — you can make an executive decision to lighten your child’s load for a night, if:

  • S/he doesn’t understand the assignment.
  • The assignment is vague or touches on a topic she’s not ready for.
  • S/he’s exhausted from a long day of school, gymnastics, and an argument with her best friend. 

If your child is completely lost, write your child's teacher a note for assistance. In the cases, shorten the assignment, says Cathy Vatterott, Ph.D., a University of Missouri-St. Louis professor of education and author of Rethinking Homework. What you can’t skip is informing the teacher. “Have your child write a note explaining,” says Vatterott.  Most teachers will be understanding if a student does this once in a while, says Grace, but if your child frequently fails to finish her assignments, there will probably be a consequence.

 

5. Change the Scene: Best for Daydreamers

Something as simple as a special place to work can boost a child’s motivation and, in turn, his/her confidence. “I let one kid at a time use my office if they are having trouble,” says Jennifer Harrison, of Sacramento, CA, mom of a 7- and an 11-year-old. “Being in the spot where Mom does grown-up work seems to help them focus. Maybe because I tell them that it’s my place to concentrate.”

 

6. Leave the Room: Best for Whiners

“Kids who drag things out are often doing so for your attention — they’re enjoying the interaction on some level,” explains Grace. “Avoid joining in. If you must stay in the room, have your child work in a spot that’s farther away from whatever you’re doing.”

 

7. Beat the Clock: Best for Procrastinators

Sometimes a child just needs a jump-start. If that’s true for yours, try Dolin’s “Five Minutes of Fury”: Set a timer for five minutes, shout “Go!” and have your child work as fast as s/he can until the timer goes off. At that point, s/he can take a short break or keep going — and many kids continue. “Racing against a timer gives kids an external sense of urgency if they don’t have an internal one,”(besides, it’s fun!). But it’s not an excuse for sloppy work, so tell your child to go over it before s/he puts it back in her binder.

 

9. Plan, Plan, Plan: Best for 3rd- to 5th-Graders

Many teachers will break down big projects into a series of deadlines so that children learn to budget time. If you child needs help with this, show your child how to “scaffold” the assignment. Together, divide the project into steps, then help estimate how much time each will take. Use the weekly/monthly calendar, and then write down which steps to tackle when — and for how long. To get the most out of your child's calendar, include everything — from basketball practice on Mondays to the reading log every night so you both can plan realistically. If you know which nights are going to be a problem, Ask for advance notice on assignments if needed.  Teachers will often work with you on this, but most parents are afraid to ask.

 

9. Let ’Em Vent: Best for Everyone

When your routine is upended — and your kid hasn’t even started his homework — ease frustration by letting him complain. Listen, empathize (“Wow, that is a lot of work”), and state his feelings back to him (“You sound upset”). Once your child feels understood, says Dolin, your child will be more likely to accept your suggestions — and better able to focus on what needs to be done.

 

Plus: Your Way vs. The Teacher’s

Your child’s tearing up over a long-division worksheet and you actually remember how to get the answer. But the teacher’s instructions are different. Do you show your kid your method — so at least she’ll have the correct answer?  My thoughts vary from the experts.  I believe that you graduated grades 3/4/5 and can help your child with a method that might work for him/her. 

 

But the experts say...hold off.  Your process may confuse your child even more. You can help by talking about what s/he remembers from class and move back to the textbook or math homework tip sheets. Still lost? Just have  write a note to the teacher explaining that your child doesn’t understand.

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

Attendance at school means that your child won't miss out on learning.  Being prompt and being at school the entire day ensures that your child receives the full school experience.  As always, Templeton Schools  promote, encourage, and reward good attendance.  Be a part of something cool - BE IN SCHOOL!

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

Be Safe and Be Polite are our two school rules.  Please model this for your children during pick-up and drop-off times.  

Here are some tips (and a map) to keep things moving while keeping your sanity.

  • AM coverage is available starting at 7:15 AM.  Drop off your VES student at this time (no sooner) and allow yourself time to commute to other schools or work.
  • The trail to the Vineyards was intended for children living in this community.  The dog park was intended for dogs and their owners.  The use of this area as a pick-up zone has created extreme traffic conditions and dangers for students getting picked-up there.  The dog park is an easy spot for predators to look for children.  Truly, these are not safe places to pick up your children.  Take the extra time and pick the kids up on campus where they can be supervised and have access to the front office.
  • Pull in front of or behind the cross walk entering in the school.  Please do not block the crosswalk. This is a safety zone for pedestrians.
  • Try to have your child ready to go when you drop off.  This is a kiss and go zone, as many parents are trying to get to their next designation.
  • Student safety is our utmost priority.  Please follow the directions of the adults on duty.
  • Do not pull through the exit lanes to cut ahead of other cars, or cut through the fifth grade parking lot to get into the 3rd grade area. It is dangerous (lots of kids and parents walking through the parking areas, and it is also impolite.
  • Pull forward.  Your child can walk to your car and you will make the people behind you very happy.
  • By the time everyone has a set schedule, it only takes 15 minutes from the sound of the closing bell to exit the campus.
  • We thank you for being a patient and courteous driver.  This is a good model for your children.  After all they will also be driving in a few short years.
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Posted by: AJ Alsup
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

MUSIC BUILDS STRONG MINDS:

There is no doubt, and science proves it, music builds strong minds.  Take a look at this link, which will discuss the auditory pathways that develop in children who are exposed to music during the elementary years.

 

VES MUSIC/DRAMA PROGRAM:  

Our program will be different beginning in 2017, with the addition of Ms. Melton who will teach 3-8th grade music in our schools.  By the end of your child's years at VES, they will have learned to play an instrument and know how to read music.  Ms. Melton is also adept at vocal instruction.  Do not fear, Mrs. Powell has not left us!  She is our new English Language Learner Teacher and will continue with our very popular after-school drama program.

 

STRINGS IN THE SCHOOLS:

Violin classes will continue in 2017 through our partnership with the San Luis Youth Symphony.  You can register for this popular Wednesday afternoon class by visiting this website  and be sure to look for fliers coming home soon.

 

MUSIC MOTIVE:

Thanks to our partnership with Music Motive we continue to offer introductions to percussion, guitar, and piano at VES each year. We would like to thank the talented Mr. Bronkar for his ablilities with so many instruments. Keep an eye out for fliers coming home each trimester.  You can also click this link to connect to Music Motive to sign-up for these great classes.  Small keyboards are available from the school for check-out if you need a practice keyboard at home.

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

The staff and students at VES are excited to be using our new FabLab.  Part science lab, part fabrication lab, this room will act like a Makers Space at our school.  Click on the resources tab above then find the link to our FabLab.  We hope you will want to join us in making the FabLab an integral part of the future at VES.  Contact Mrs. Brooks at lbrooks@templetonusd.org if you want to be a FabDad or MakerMom and be added to the list of folks whose expertise, ideas, and/or helping hands can make this Makers' Space thrive and grow.

 

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

Oct. 9: Staff Development day, no school for students

*Oct. 11:  Regular Day at VES.  3rd grade released at 2:45, 4/5th grades released at 2:50

Oct. 19:  Great California Shake-out Earthquake preparedness drill at 10:19 AM.  Are you ready at home?

Oct. 23 – 27:  VES GREAT week (see following article for more details)

Oct. 24:   VES Picture retake day.

Oct. 25:  Early Release Day 3rd grade released at 1:40, 4/5th grades released at 1:45

Oct. 27:  Monthly awards assembly

Oct. 27:  Vision screening for grade 5.  If your child is in a different grade and you would like a vision screening for your child, please contact the school nurse by calling the front office 434-5840.

Oct. 31 – VES PTO Jog-A-Thon (details forthcoming) Feel free to wear Halloween colors, but no costumes on Oct. 31.

*Nov. 1 - Sugar warning.  We expect candy to come in lunches.  The correct number of candy pieces is three.  Any excess candy will be bagged and sent home with the child who brought it at the end of the day. 

Nov. 1 - Early Release Day 3rd grade released at 1:40, 4/5th grades released at 1:45

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage
Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

To eliminate long lunch lines, please have your child place their money in an envelope with their student number.  This should be turned into the lunch envelope at the beginning of the school day, or to the drop box outside the cafeteria entrance.

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

cold vs flu

There is nothing worse than being sick (unless you are sick of being sick).  There is no replacement for a day at school, but when you are down and out we want you to stay home and get well.  Our school policy is to collect work for absent children during the time they are gone.  Look for it on your desk, or check with your teacher when you return. If you have to be out for three or more days, contact the office or your  teacher and we can arrange to have materials in the office for pick-up.  Please don't drop by the room to pick-up work, as the class will be busy working.

Independent Study Contracts (ISC) allow us to give your child homework/classwork in advance.  We need a week's prior notice with a completed ISC form. ISC's apply to absences of five or more days.  This is a win-win for your child and our school, as our students return from extended absences will be granted an"excused absence" (work must be turned in upon the child's return to class). Additionally, your child will be ready to be a part of the classroom again with minimum "catch-up" time needed!

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Posted by: School Loop
Published: 10/16/17




Audience: Homepage

If you have ever seen those "Box tops for Education" labels on cereal, tissue boxes, etc., be sure to save them.   The PTO received 4,550 box tops, which means PTO should be getting a check for $455 in the next month or two! Thank you in advance for helping bring much needed money to our school.

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Posted by: Web Designer
Published: 10/1/17




Audience: Homepage

Please click on attachment for April lunch menu.

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Posted by: Stefanie Hermes
Published: 3/14/17